Avoid buying high heels in the morning. This is because your feet tend to be relaxed in the then. It is advisable to go shoe shopping when your feet are swollen and tired, preferably in the evening on your way from work. Before purchasing, be sure to try them again in the morning just to compare both situations. If it fits as well then you can make the payment.
You don't have to be a Next Top Model fan to know that when it comes to walking in heels, Tyra actually does know what she's talking about. Perhaps that's why she created this video. A few rules from Tyra: Realize you’re not on a casual stroll in sneakers and that posture is essential to adding flow to your stride. The correct way to walk in heels involves keeping your head and spine straight, as if you're being pulled up by a string. As you walk, use your hips to shift and lift your legs to the center with each step you take. Your paces should look more like a light bounce than like you're saving yourself from a fall. Since wearing your heels means your feet no longer form a 90 degree angle with your ankles, changing your gait will help you readjust your body's center of gravity and find balance. You still won't feel like you're walking on clouds, but this method will at least make heels feel more bearable.
3. Widen the toes out with ice. When water freezes, it expands. Use this simple science lesson to stretch out your shoes. Start by filling a one-quart sized ziplock bag about halfway full of water. Then, zip up the bag and check to make sure it’s not leaking. Stick the water bag into the toe of the heel and put the entire shoe in the freezer. If you really need to stretch them out, add two or more bags into the toe box. Once frozen, the bags will expand and the shoe.
Add footpads: I then Frankenstein my own orthotics into every shoe, depending on the fit. Consider one of these: a very slim insert with a heel cup and slight arch (if you need arch support), heel cushion (for heel pain) or a foot “tongue” pad (use under the foot for cushion, or put on the underside of the top of the shoe to prevent sliding forward). A podiatrist can help you with custom inserts, or you can do as I do, which is buy them in bulk at the drugstore or online.  
Whether her explanation is 100 percent scientifically sound is, in this case, slightly irrelevant. By my fourth day of wearing five-inch ankle boots without any pain, I was sold. Personally, I prefer using Band-Aids, bandages, or soft tape, since the thought of securing my two toes together with anything stickier gives me goosebumps and the fear of damaging my feet even further.
Whether her explanation is 100 percent scientifically sound is, in this case, slightly irrelevant. By my fourth day of wearing five-inch ankle boots without any pain, I was sold. Personally, I prefer using Band-Aids, bandages, or soft tape, since the thought of securing my two toes together with anything stickier gives me goosebumps and the fear of damaging my feet even further.
Bend and twist them. You can work out the stiffness of your new heels by bending and twisting them. Apply slight pressure as you bend the shoes upwards and downwards and twist them side to side. Don’t do either method too hard or too quickly. You don’t want to force the shoe into a position that it shouldn’t be making. Doing so could damage the shoe or weaken it in places that should remain sturdy.
There are many different types of aids to help make a shoe more comfortable even after "breaking them in," and can be purchased at shoe stores, large retailers, and some drugstores. These include special small gel pads for the balls of the feet, heel inserts to help minimize chafing at the back of the shoe and rough patches to glue onto the bottom of a slick sole, affording you better traction.

Whether her explanation is 100 percent scientifically sound is, in this case, slightly irrelevant. By my fourth day of wearing five-inch ankle boots without any pain, I was sold. Personally, I prefer using Band-Aids, bandages, or soft tape, since the thought of securing my two toes together with anything stickier gives me goosebumps and the fear of damaging my feet even further.
Shoe expert Dr Naomi Braithwaite of Nottingham Trent University revealed that a good fit and a little help from gel insoles can go a long way. She told HELLO!: "Gel insoles can be delightful on the soles of the feet, particularly if you are going to be wearing at an occasion when standing is on the agenda. Ultimately fit is key so it is important to have heels that fit well and that have a padding in between the inner sock and sole of the shoe."

"Wearing high heels changes the natural biomechanics of the foot which has been honed by thousands of years of walking," he explains. "We also walk on concrete all day every day, which is bad for your feet, leading to a cocktail recipe of stresses to overload joints, muscles and tendons which work together in complex clockwork action to form a normal step.


Consider a lower or more comfortable style. Choose a thicker and more stable heel like a platform, wedge, or chunky heel to provide more support and weight distribution. Shy away from pointed-toe styles if you have wide feet or toes, opting for round or almond-shaped instead. You can also buy heeled boots or heels with ankle straps to help support your ankles.[3]
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