Tags: ball of foot pain from high heels, best high heel insoles, best insoles for heel pain, foot pain from wearing heels, heel spur, high heel pain, how to make high heels more comfortable, how to relieve foot pain from high heels, how to wear high heels without pain, insoles for heel pain, plantar fasciitis shoes, shoe inserts for plantar fasciitis, superfeet

Making sure that the leather is conditioned is one thing that you can do to help keep your shoes in tip-top shape. Canfield McNish also recommended making sure that all of your heels have non-slip pads attached to the bottom. You can buy these at shoe stores, online, at stores like Target and Walmart, or at your local cobbler. The pads help keep you avoid slipping, but they also help protect your shoes from premature wear.

Recently I was at a friend’s birthday where a few of us were debating the plausibility of walking home in  heels after a night of standing around. Now  I love heels, high high heels. In fact the higher the better. I love the line they give the leg, I love how elegant they make me look…..what I’m having trouble with is how they feel. After years of taking ballet and wearing pointe shoes you’d think I could handle heels but lately anything fancier than a sneaker is causing me foot pain.


Blast your heels with heat.[1] Heat is an effective way to soften a material and make it more pliable. Carefully warm your heels using a blow dryer or a small heater for about a minute or two. Watch how your heels react to the heat because certain materials don't do so well under heat for long periods of time. You can bend and twist your heels while they’re still warm. Or you can wait until they’ve cooled and put them on with a pair of socks to stretch them.

In the past, a night in heels always meant a trip to the drug store the next morning for a new pack of Band Aids for the blisters and black-and-blue marks on my knees. (Yes, I'm that 5'7" girl who has no idea how to walk in heels.) Ahead, find eight incredibly useful hacks to make high heels more comfortable and watch my aesthetic transform from high-top Michael Jordan to high-heel Carrie Bradshaw . . . because heels should be enjoyed and celebrated, not associated with dread.
Stretch your feet before and after you put your shoes on/off. There are some targeted stretches that will help you get at the front of the foot and ankle (key pain points from heel usage). An example of a stretch like this is pointing your toes down, and pulling your toes up with a strap, this gets the Achilles’ tendon and the calf muscles going a bit. You can replicate this stretch to the inside and outside as well.
So there you have it, 10 ten simple and easy to use tips for how to make wearing heels not only tolerable but hopefully a bit comfortable. Heels look great and can be a perfect addition to almost any outfit, we believe that wearing them doesn’t have to be a miserable experience. Have we missed a tip or a workaround that you swear by?  Don’t be shy — let us know in the comments!
You need to find your correct shoe size if you want to get rid of the pain. If you wear heels that fit you perfectly, your pain will lessen drastically. But if you choose a size bigger than your foot size, you will feel uncomfortable all the time because it will get out of your legs continuously. But remember that on the other hand, if your shoes are too tight for your feet, then it will hurt them and leave ugly marks on them. So you need to choose the correct size so that you feel comfortable while walking.

Have you ever noticed how frustrating it is to deal with your feet slipping out of your heels the minute they leave the ground? Even worse, loose shoes often make you drag your feet in an attempt to prevent them from falling out. Heels with straps, ties, or buckles over the ankle or feet offer a solution. Go for adjustable straps to accommodate swelling.


Back blisters are the bane of every heel-wearer’s existence. (It’s bad enough your toes are suffering, but your heels, too?) To help prevent friction—that causes the blisters—against your heels, rub a little lip balm to the back of your feet where the skin meets the shoes. This will form an extra layer that’ll help prevent any painful blisters from ruining your day.
Rough up the bottoms of your heels.[5] It’s important that your shoes have a decent amount of traction on the bottom. Walking in high heels will be a lot easier and safer if you’re not sliding around all over the place. New heels tend to have smoother bottoms that become rougher once scuffed. Speed up the process by roughing up the bottom of your heels using a piece of sandpaper. Rub the bottom of your heels for a minute or two, or until the bottoms feel noticeably rougher.
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