Looking for a new take on your basic ballet flat? These low pumps are perfect for spring and summer, thanks to their pink patent-leather upper. Plus, at a height of just 1 1/2 inches, the shoes meet our podiatrists’ standards: “Try to keep heel height three inches and below,” says Dr. Splichal. “For every inch over three, the stress to the foot and body dramatically increases.” 
Many of us love stilettos the way we love German chocolate cake. We know we can only handle a nibble or two, but goodness, how we want to gobble the whole thing up at once. Instead of wearing thin heels at all times, consider incorporating a funky wide heel into your wardrobe, as a chunkier heel will allow for your weight to be more evenly distributed, creating less pressure on the front of your foot, Vie Carpenter said.

Here’s an interesting tip — one certainly worth trying if it means a painless shoe experience. “Taping your third and fourth toes together (counting from the big toe) will help with the pain,” Stempien said. “Yes, it’s a little weird, but there’s actually a nerve there that contributes to foot pain. Stress on the nerve is alleviated when supported by the other toe. Keep in mind this might not work for high-heeled sandals or deep peep-toes.”
That pain that you feel at the end of a long night—no, it's not a hangover and it's not exhaustion. We're talking about something worse—the pain that's caused by a seemingly evil and malicious pair of high heels. But, believe it or not, not all high heels are created equal. In some cases, they can actually be healthier for your feet than flats. "Excess pronation is a condition that affects 75 percent of the population and has been related to many conditions, such as heel pain (otherwise known as plantar fasciitis), knee pain, and even lower-back pain," says podiatrist Phillip Vasyli.
As a New Yorker, I walk a lot. To get to and from the subway, I walk about two miles daily, if Google Maps is to be believed. Before I even got to work on Monday, the familiar pain in the balls of my feet was there. By the end of Tuesday, both feet were sore from wearing heels two days in a row. By lunch on Wednesday, I had slipped back into flats, plummeting three inches back to earth.
3. Widen the toes out with ice. When water freezes, it expands. Use this simple science lesson to stretch out your shoes. Start by filling a one-quart sized ziplock bag about halfway full of water. Then, zip up the bag and check to make sure it’s not leaking. Stick the water bag into the toe of the heel and put the entire shoe in the freezer. If you really need to stretch them out, add two or more bags into the toe box. Once frozen, the bags will expand and the shoe.
Directions — Once your feet start to feel pain, follow these steps: 1. Apply thoroughly to each foot like lotion 2. Let dry for one minute 3. Slip on your shoes and continue your day pain free Spray a thin layer to affected area every 6 to 8 hours, not to exceed 3 applications in a 24 hour period. adults and children 12 years and older apply and gently massage in repeat as needed no more that four times a day Wash hands after each use with cold water

Also, if you're wondering whether this means Katie has had maxi pads in her shoes every time we've seen her at a Pump event, the answer is "most of the time." If you're a huge fan of the show, you must read my entire chat with her. I found her to be super relatable, and she shared some mean beauty DIYs (as well as answering my fangirl question about Kyle Richards' hair).


Heels are essential to wardrobes, but there’s nothing worse than putting together an amazing outfit for work or for a night out, only to be sidelined an hour in because your feet are throbbing in pain. The is no doubt that high heels look great on our feet but the moment we try to shove them back into that old torture chamber that is four-inch stilettos, they immediately start screaming in pain. It doesn’t have to be this way so to help we have put together top tips for being able to walk (and dance) in heels without pain.

So there you have it, 10 ten simple and easy to use tips for how to make wearing heels not only tolerable but hopefully a bit comfortable. Heels look great and can be a perfect addition to almost any outfit, we believe that wearing them doesn’t have to be a miserable experience. Have we missed a tip or a workaround that you swear by?  Don’t be shy — let us know in the comments!
Deodorant: According to Mashable, rubbing some deodorant on the back and sides of your feet can make new heels feel smooth as your armpits! The deodorant "eases the friction" between your skin and tough new material to prevent blisters. Speaking from experience, the most important thing here is to make sure the deodorant is dry before putting your shoes on.
Cover the parts of your feet that are being pinched by your heels with moleskin, soak your feet in water, and then wear your heels for a few hours.[8] Moleskin is basically a more comfortable bandage that comes in sheets that you can cut into any size. One side is sticky and one side is soft. It protects the areas of your feet that hurt when wearing your heels, which is typically where blisters might form. Dampening the moleskin and then wearing your shoes will help the insides of your shoes to mold more quickly to the shape of your foot.
She also suggests some products for pain relief, like foot alignment socks, Correct Toes, or other toe spacers when not wearing your heels. And, regular stretching and exercises can help, too. DeGrave notes a few simple exercises from Katy Bowman, and also suggests: "keep a half foam roller somewhere you might find yourself standing around for a few minutes, say in the bathroom while you brush your teeth, so you can calf stretch while going about your day — I keep one out on my living room floor and do this while watching tv!"
Recently I was at a friend’s birthday where a few of us were debating the plausibility of walking home in  heels after a night of standing around. Now  I love heels, high high heels. In fact the higher the better. I love the line they give the leg, I love how elegant they make me look…..what I’m having trouble with is how they feel. After years of taking ballet and wearing pointe shoes you’d think I could handle heels but lately anything fancier than a sneaker is causing me foot pain.
When you walk, lead with your thighs, moving your entire leg forward at once. Think about it: You're probably used to letting your feet lead, right? It takes practice, but you'll find yourself putting less pressure on the ball of your foot this way. And remember: Move your legs from the hips and keep your legs straight. Bending knees looks goofy with heels.
3. Widen the toes out with ice. When water freezes, it expands. Use this simple science lesson to stretch out your shoes. Start by filling a one-quart sized ziplock bag about halfway full of water. Then, zip up the bag and check to make sure it’s not leaking. Stick the water bag into the toe of the heel and put the entire shoe in the freezer. If you really need to stretch them out, add two or more bags into the toe box. Once frozen, the bags will expand and the shoe.
Consider a lower or more comfortable style. Choose a thicker and more stable heel like a platform, wedge, or chunky heel to provide more support and weight distribution. Shy away from pointed-toe styles if you have wide feet or toes, opting for round or almond-shaped instead. You can also buy heeled boots or heels with ankle straps to help support your ankles.[3]
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